Fluoride, Low Fluoride or Fluoride Free?

Tooth decay is still Australia's most prevalent disease but which toothpaste should we be using, fluoride, low fluoride or fluoride free? For more realistic Parenting, check out www.imperfectmummy.com Tooth decay is still Australia's most prevalent disease but which toothpaste should we be using, fluoride, low fluoride or fluoride free? For more realistic Parenting, check out www.imperfectmummy.com Tooth decay is still Australia's most prevalent disease but which toothpaste should we be using, fluoride, low fluoride or fluoride free? For more realistic Parenting, check out www.imperfectmummy.comTooth decay is still Australia's most prevalent disease but which toothpaste should we be using, fluoride, low fluoride or fluoride free? For more realistic Parenting, check out www.imperfectmummy.com

Guest post by Les Szabo from BioMinToothpaste.com.au

It is amazing that tooth decay is still Australia’s most prevalent disease, and one of the most preventable. We know we should brush our teeth, but which toothpaste should we be using, fluoride, low fluoride or fluoride free?

Demineralisation and Remineralisation.

The tooth’s outer protective layer is called the enamel. Acids (acidic foods and sugars converted to acid by oral bacteria) dissolve the enamel, in a process called “demineralisation”. Fortunately, there is a natural process called “remineralisation” which re-deposits these minerals. If demineralisation is greater than remineralisation decay occurs and ultimately cavities form.

If you like this post then check out: 11 Toxic Children’s Products You Probably Use

Tooth decay is still Australia's most prevalent disease but which toothpaste should we be using, fluoride, low fluoride or fluoride free? For more realistic Parenting, check out www.imperfectmummy.comWhat does fluoride do?

Fluoride strengthens the enamel by making the tooth more acid resistant. It also helps increase the speed of the remineralisation process.

Does fluoride work?

Unequivocally yes. It is one of the most studied minerals we use, working both as an additive to our drinking water and our toothpaste.

Is fluoride dangerous?

Professional and government consensus says the benefits outweigh the risks. There is risk of fluorosis (white mottling of adult teeth) which can occur from too much fluoride ingested during adult teeth formative years. A reduction in fluoride reduces the risk of fluorosis.

Diet is the first step

Good dental care starts with a good diet, avoiding processed sugars and acidic foods helps stop the demineralisation process. Calcium rich food such as milk helps provide the building blocks to help remineralise the tooth.

Tooth decay is still Australia's most prevalent disease but which toothpaste should we be using, fluoride, low fluoride or fluoride free? For more realistic Parenting, check out www.imperfectmummy.comShould we and our kids use a fluoridated toothpaste?

Ultimately the decision to use or not to is up to the individual: low fluoride or fluoride free.

 

Fluoride toothpaste

The ADA (Australian Dental Association) recommends the following fluoride levels in toothpaste:

  • Eruption to 17mth teeth should be cleaned but without toothpaste, unless decay risk is high.
  • 18 mth to 5 yrs, cleaned twice per day with the toothpaste containing 500 – 550 ppm fluoridated toothpaste. Children should NOT swallow but spit out and not rinse.
  • For ages 6+ twice or more frequently per day, using 1,000-1500 ppm fluoridated toothpaste. Do NOT swallow but spit out and not rinse.

The increase in fluoride content increases the time fluoride is therapeutically beneficial. Regular adult toothpaste approx. 2 hrs.

Low fluoride toothpastes

Parents interested in reducing their fluoride content by up to 60% (530 ppm) but still wanting the benefits that fluoride brings may be interested in a new class of toothpaste called BioMin F. BioMin F fights decay by remineralising faster and up to 6X longer than regular and even many high fluoride toothpastes. (Ages 6 + or as advised by dentists)

Fluoride free toothpaste

Fluoride free toothpastes have become popular in recent years, though not generally recommended or supported by the dental fraternity.  Fluoride free BioMin C is changing this, with scientific testing demonstrating its ability to fight early decay by driving the remineralisation process.  (Note fluoridated toothpastes benefit from improved acid resistance).

With low fluoride toothpastes now able to outperform regular toothpastes the choice is really between low fluoride and fluoride free, scientifically low fluoride toothpastes are superior but for some avoiding added fluoride is the only choice.

Do you use a toothpaste with Fluoride? What are your thoughts?

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1 Comment

  1. November 24, 2018 / 3:30 am

    This was so helpful! I had no idea about low fluoride! But my daughter just ate 6 oranges so I probably need to look at our toothpaste!

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